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These Cannabis Edibles Look A Little Familiar, No?

· Nov 1, 2021
You can find the edibles for sale online through various unregulated retailers and other California unlicensed shops. They often contain high levels of THC; for many, this is great news. You ca ...

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California Attorney General Rob Bonta published a consumer alert targeting illegal and strong cannabis edibles for sale that are familiarly packaged. These edibles all look weirdly similar to the candies we were snacking on yesterday for Halloween.

You can find the edibles for sale online through various unregulated retailers and other California unlicensed shops. They often contain high levels of THC; for many, this is great news. You can now show off your nostalgic-looking edibles and get your friends ripped since the candies contain more THC than the legal limit allows.

“These aren’t Doritos; these are not Sour Patch Kids; these are not Oreos. They are unregulated and untested cannabis products sold by unlicensed manufacturers and marketed to underage Californians,” Bonta explained in the consumer alert.

Bonta continued by stating that these look-alike bags of Doritos contain a whopping 600 milligrams of psychoactive THC in one single bag, which is six times more than the original 100 milligrams that the California government deems legal in edibles.

“While cannabis-infused edibles packaged to look like our favorite brands may seem harmless and fun, the dangers of consuming unregulated and untested cannabis products are high, particularly for children and teens,” Bonta continued.

In conclusion, Bonta encourages cannabis users who indulge in edibles to keep an eye open for signs that might depict whether or not the cannabis products they’re purchasing are legal. There is a universal cannabis symbol that ensures the product is legal; a triangle with a marijuana leaf and an exclamation point inside it, with “CA” written underneath.

“If you see indications of copycat packaging or do not see the universal symbol, the product is illicit and may be dangerous,” Bonta concluded. Although the potent THC in these edibles is one of the matters at hand, another critical factor is how similar these candies look to your average sweets. Bonta said that these products could lure teens to the illegal cannabis market while also appealing to younger kids who could very well eat them without knowing they contain a drug.

Although students and kids who suffer from various disorders can now access their medical cannabis at school, edibles and candies like the ones mentioned above will definitely put the wrong idea in children’s minds.

To see classmates take a legal tincture drop for muscle spasms is one thing, but to see the “cool kids” huddle around a bag of unlicensed cannabis treats is an incredibly dangerous other scenario that we must be more careful about.